Phone: 045 874682

Picking the Right Running Shoes

Naas Chiropractor & Physio. Running Shoes advice

Running Shoes. Ross Allen is a former Ireland rugby & County Football Player.

How Do I Pick the Correct Running Shoes for Me?

Before deciding on the correct running shoes, it is important to dispel a few myths regarding running shoes and what their role is. Research suggests that running related injuries have not decreased over the past 40 years despite the constant ‘advancement’ in research and shoe development. The most common issue that I hear patients bring up in the clinic is that they have been told that they over-pronate and therefore they have been provided with orthotics to ‘correct’ this. Let’s firstly address the issue of foot pronation and injury risk.

Shoe inserts and orthotics have been used for decades to prevent injuries in runner’s. Even though there was no research to substantiate the claim, foot pronation was considered one of the major variables in injury rates in the early scientific literature. It therefore was considered to be one of the major considerations in shoe design as it was implicated in running related injuries.

FOOT PRONATION 

Foot pronation is not associated with increased injury risk in novice runners wearing a neutral shoe: a 1-year prospective cohort study

The commonly held belief that increased foot pronation is associated with an increased risk of injury is not backed up by the scientific literature. Therefore, this brings into question the benefit of anti pronation shoes and the use of orthotics to prevent injury in runners.

Results of this study showed that at one year follow-up compared with a neutral foot posture, no significant differences were found after 250 km of running for highly supinated feet, supinated feet, pronated feet and highly pronated feet. Most interestingly, the findings revealed that pronators had a significantly lower number of injuries/1000 km of running than those with a neutral foot posture. However, those with highly pronated feet had the highest number of injuries per 1000km of running.

Conclusions: The results of the present study contradict the widespread belief that moderate foot pronation is associated with an increased risk of injury among novice runners taking up running in a neutral running shoe. More work is needed to ascertain if highly pronated feet face a higher risk of injury than neutral feet.

Ref: Nielsen et al. (2014). Foot pronation is not associated with increased injury risk in novice runners wearing a neutral shoe: a 1-year prospective cohort study.  British Journal of Sports Medicine.

Ref: http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2013/06/12/bjsports-2013-092202.abstract

Ref: Ning et al. (2015). Running shoes and running injuries: mythbusting and a proposal for two new paradigms: ‘preferred movement path’ and ‘comfort filter’. British Journal of Sports Medicine; 49: 1290-1294.

Ref: http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/49/20/1290.full.pdf+html

About

We are delighted to welcome you to Naas Physio Clinic website (Chartered Physiotherapy & Chiropractor). We take pride in offering the best available Physiotherapy & Chiropractor expertise to Naas & Newbridge.

Menu
error: Content is protected !!